Water, you cannot live without it

It is the most important source for maintaining life.  We cannot store water therefore we must drink it every day.

Our bodies are 70 % water and every organ in our body needs it to function.

The body loses water through breathing, sweating, and digestion, which is why it’s important to rehydrate by drinking fluids and eating foods that contain water. … Your body uses water in all its cells, organs, and tissues to help regulate its temperature and maintain other bodily functions (source).

Even minimal dehydration can cause:

  • Dry skin that doesn’t improve with lotion. …
  • Dry, sticky mouth and excessive thirst. …
  • You’re dealing with a headache. …
  • You’re tired all the time. …
  • You’re gaining weight. …
  • You’re coping with constipation. …
  • You are hungry
  • You’ve had a urinary tract infection.

First we feel thirsty and fatigued, and may develop a mild headache. This eventually gives way to grumpiness, and mental and physical decline (source)

Importance of water

Water is needed for most body functions, including to:

  • maintain the health and integrity of every cell in the body
  • keep the bloodstream liquid enough to flow through blood vessels
  • help eliminate the byproducts of the body’s metabolism, excess electrolytes (for example, sodium and potassium), and urea, which is a waste product formed through the processing of dietary protein
  • regulate body temperature through sweating
  • moisten mucous membranes such as those of the lungs and mouth
  • lubricate and cushion joints
  • reduce the risk of cystitis by keeping the bladder clear of bacteria
  • aid digestion and prevent constipation
  • moisturise the skin to maintain its texture and appearance
  • carry nutrients and oxygen to cells
  • serve as a shock absorber inside the eyes, spinal cord and in the amniotic sac surrounding the fetus in pregnancy.
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by Freedesignfile.com

What happens when you dehydrate?

By the time you feel thirsty your body is already dehydrated; our thirst mechanism lags behind our actual level of hydration.

Dehydration of as little as 2% loss of body weight results in impaired physiological responses and performance.  It appears that brain tissue fluid decreases with dehydration, thus reducing brain volume and temporarily affecting cell function.

As you “lose” body water without replacing it, your blood becomes more concentrated and, at a point, this triggers your kidneys to retain water. The result: you urinate less.

The thicker and more concentrated your blood becomes, the harder it is for your cardiovascular system to compensate by increasing heart rate to maintain blood pressure (source).

Lack of water also negatively impacts oral hygiene.  Fluid intake can affect saliva production. Saliva, which is primarily water, is essential for maintenance of oral health.

Recommended daily fluid intake by the Victoria State Government

Approximate adequate daily intakes of fluids (including plain water, milk and other drinks) in litres per day include:

  • infants 0–6 months – 0.7 l (from breast milk or formula)
  • infants 7–12 months – 0.9 l (from breast milk, formula and other foods and drinks)
  • children 1–3 years – 1.0 l (about 4 cups)
  • children 4–8 years – 1.2 l (about 5 cups)
  • girls 9–13 years – 1.4 l (about 5-6 cups)
  • boys 9–13 years – 1.6 l (about 6 cups)
  • girls 14–18 years – 1.6 l (about 6 cups)
  • boys 14–18 years – 1.9 l (about 7-8 cups)
  • women – 2.1 l (about 8 cups)
  • men – 2.6 l (about 10 cups).
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by Freedesignfile.com

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