What is Wellbeing?

Wellbeing is an integral part of what we do here at Croydon Herbal Health.  Your wellbeing matters to us.  A joyous and fulfilling life is built on a foundation of health, self-care and living in line with nature, writes Meredith Gaston, in her new book, The Art of Wellbeing.

What is wellbeing?

I would describe wellbeing as the holistic experience of feeling energised, comfortable, connected and inspired. Our personal wellbeing is cultivated by all the unconditionally kind, wise and compassionate choices we make to nurture our health and happiness. These choices encompass our thoughts and our actions, our self-talk and our speech, the foods we eat, the ways we care for our bodies, and the support we provide for ourselves and each other.

What we choose to do with our time sculpts our wellness and matters greatly. When we invite the simple and relaxing practices of gratitude and mindfulness into our daily lives, we begin to sense the willingness of our minds and bodies to collaborate fully with us in the most positive, transformative ways.

By living intentionally, actively choosing love, peace and joy for ourselves and each other in every moment, we come to know a deep sense of wellbeing that creates a simple, unfailing foundation for truly joyous living.

Our thoughts create our worlds by inspiring our attitudes and our moods, our daily choices, self-talk and actions. It is truly empowering to realise that our thoughts are inherently flexible. Even if we have learnt patterns in the past that no longer serve us, it is completely within our power to let them go.

When we live as part of nature, our wellbeing blossoms. Cultivating wellbeing in daily life is a truly joyous and fulfilling commitment. When we nourish our inner gardens each day, we are able to embody and experience the limitless comfort, joy and inspiration we seek.

10 tips for cultivating wellbeing

#1 Choose Joy

Each one of us can actively choose to think thoughts that uplift us, speak words that spread joy, and explore ideas that help us grow. We can choose joy when we do work we love, and do it lovingly. We can choose exercise we enjoy doing, relax in ways that revitalise us, and choose people in our lives whose love and support empower us. When we build our daily lives around choosing joy, we may truly experience radiant wellbeing. We simply make consistently positive, life-affirming choices that light us up from the inside out.

When we choose joy, we see that life is not about sacrifice and deprivation, it is about celebration. When we forgo gruelling exercise regimes, unnecessarily hectic agendas and punishing diets, we may love our way to wellness. Wellbeing is not maintained by punishment or suffering, it is supported by unconditional self-love, passion and positive thinking.

Choosing joy also serves us exceptionally well during any challenging experience. We all have the power to learn and change for the better, growing our compassion, wisdom and gratitude through our personal life experiences. Not only does joy strengthen us to handle stress and adversity as our best selves, it always illuminates the swiftest path back to perspective and composure.

#2 Love the Earth

Our wellbeing is also shaped by the health of our natural environment: the air we breathe, the soil in which our foods are grown, the quality of our water, the health of our oceans, rivers and forests, and the countless magnificent species with whom we share this earth.

In order to connect to the earth, we need to spend more time in nature. Go outside. Put your feet in the sand, the soil, the grass. We live amongst the most varied and magnificent flora and fauna, spectacular mountain ranges, coral reefs, vivid fields of flowers, constellations of stars, creatures great and small. It is a privilege to be here experiencing life on our planet.

Connecting with our Earth is essential. We are part of nature, and her seasons, moods, beauty, uniqueness and splendour mirror our very own. The Sufi poet Rumi reminds us that the entire universe is inside us – how profound this is.

Also, it’s important for us to respect Earth. Recycle, upcycle, compost, walk or ride a bike, take short showers, enjoy candlelight, share tools and helping hands with neighbours, friends and family, grow your own herbs, fruits and vegetables, and mend and make do where possible.

img_4103resize-1140x500#3 Eat real food

Each day, we also have the chance to tune into the immense power of our food choices. Food is sacred, energetic and vibrational. The food we eat has a story, a source and an impact. It also plays a determining role in shaping our health, our energy levels and our moods. Eating mindfully is beneficial and healing for ourselves and our planet. When we eat mindfully we optimise our vitality, contribute to the prevention and reversal of disease, live in harmony with our Earth, and celebrate life.

The magnificent rainbow of fresh fruits and vegetables we have to choose from exemplify the beauty and generosity of Mother Nature’s pantry. Aim for a plant-strong diet that is full of colour and rich in natural vitamins and minerals. Choose organic, seasonal and, ideally, local or homegrown produce wherever possible, and you’ll never have to squint again reading fine print.

Develop a positively loving relationship with food as nourishment. Food is your primary form of medicine, an essential way of healing. It is also an extremely fun, joyous and colourful part of a natural, healthy lifestyle.

Benefits of eating real food include increased energy, sustained vitality, a healthy glow, improved concentration, healthy weight maintenance, stress reduction, decreased inflammation, real satiety, stable blood sugar levels, and balanced hormones and mood.

#4 Simplify

We need a lot less than we realise to be happy. Oftentimes when we accumulate more, we are simply on the search for the feeling of newness, worthiness or happiness that our purchases bring. By taking the time to know ourselves and love ourselves more deeply, we fill the voids we seek to fill in a much less fleeting way and on a far deeper level. Happiness is an inside job.

Living with less allows us to appreciate and value those things we mindfully choose to possess, and focus on the parts of our lives that matter most – our relationships, our experiences, and our natural environment. Opting for minimalism in every respect, we free up precious time, space and energy to use in creative and fulfilling ways each day.

#5 Prioritise self-care 

Self-care is about attending lovingly to our own various needs on a daily basis. In caring for ourselves, we are much better equipped to care for and support others. Self-care includes all the daily ground covered in these 10 tips, including eating regular, nutritious meals each day, drinking plenty of clean water, and creating a routine for the best sleep possible. Exercising, practising relaxation, and taking time to rest and be gentle with ourselves is also essential to daily self-care. When we look after our thoughts, making sure they are supportive, peaceful and uplifting assets for us, we practise the ultimate form of, self-care.

If you are looking for kindness, be kind to yourself as well as others. If you are looking for understanding from others, be compassionate and open minded towards yourself first. If you are looking for peace, be peaceful and bring peace to others. We invite  the relationships, environments and circumstances into our worlds that grow and fulfill us soulfully, and we transform our entire lives for the better.

#6 Rest

Rest and relaxation are essential to our wellbeing. Ensure you experience the best sleep possible by creating a calm and nurturing space in which to rest. Reserve your sleeping space as a tranquil, restful sanctuary. Keep a sleeping routine, aiming to tuck in and rise at the same times each day. We all have unique needs, but eight hours of sleep per night is a healthy, recommended quota for energised living.

Some people find it particularly hard to switch off at the end of the day. Keep electronic devices out of your bedroom and ensure you have as quiet and dark an atmosphere in which to sleep as possible. If you are unable to fall asleep, you might like to follow your breathing or enjoy listening to some quiet and relaxing music. You may also find comfort in a light-hearted audiobook or meditation tape. When restless, write in your journal. Jot down your worries and hurries, and support yourself without fear or impatience to gently and fully switch off.

Quality sleep recharges our batteries for life, healing, protecting and supporting our minds and bodies. If daytime naps or siestas are required, take these lovingly as part of your self-care routine and reap the refreshing benefits. We live in a fast-paced world that too often favours productivity at the expense of rest. Yet when we are rested, we experience greater productivity, mental clarity and performance on every level.

#7 Relax

The study of epigenetics demonstrates how the causes of disease are not solely genetic, and that disease can manifest due to the dietary and lifestyle choices we make. When it comes to the insidious effects of stress on our health, there is an antidote: relaxation. Relaxation is not only a practice but a choice we can all make in any moment. This may sound very simplistic, but it is true. Our lives are composed of a series of choices we make that shape our worlds and experiences. By choosing relaxation, we bring ease and flow to our lives.

Relaxation may be something we need to learn or relearn. Thankfully, there are so many pleasurable and fulfilling ways to walk this path. Practising visualisation and meditations creates a wonderful, simple practice for relaxation in daily life.

Other great ways to embrace relaxation include practising yoga or tai chi, going on gentle walks in nature, lighting candles, enjoying a bath or a massage, listening to relaxing music or enjoying light films, music or books. Creating a relaxing atmosphere around you at home and at work in which you are as comfortable as possible is also key. Our outer worlds should reflect the inner world we seek to create.

#8 Move your body

Love your body into health and fitness by stretching and moving each day. Find a balance of physical activity that suits you while challenging you and keeping you fit, vital and strong.

Exercise provides energy, is essential for our mental health, develops our coordination and fitness, shapes and tones our bodies, detoxifies our systems, improves the quality of our sleep, can be fun and sociable, is a natural antidepressant, and feels really great. Our bodies were designed to move in different ways each day, and it is essential that we honour our bodies’ needs for physical activity. Mixing up your exercise routine circumvents boredom and ensures that your whole body is strengthened and acknowledged.

#9 Hydrate

Many health issues people experience can be traced back to chronic dehydration and remedied simply by drinking ample water. More than half of your body is made of water, and you need to keep replenishing yourself to remain vital. Wake to a tall glass of warm water with a squeeze of lemon, or a dash of apple cider vinegar. Your liver and digestive system love this, and you’ll be hydrating yourself necessarily following your overnight fast. Hydrate steadily throughout the day with good, clean water. Add slices of citrus fruit or cucumber for a little excitement. Intersperse with herbal teas and coldpressed fresh juices if desired. Water your inner garden and blossom!

shutterstock_96206660#10 Connect

While some of us are more extroverted and outgoing than others, we are naturally social beings with a need for connection and relationships. Relationships are the web of our lives, and healthy relationships are necessary for our overall wellbeing. These include bonds between friends, family, colleagues, and lovers, teachers, children, grandchildren and beyond.

Relationships teach us so much by providing spaces in which we can love and be loved, give and receive support, learn and grow. Making a concerted effort to connect with others in our community and world with kindness, compassion and joy contributes to our feelings of belonging and greatly enhances our wellbeing. Our world would be a dramatically different place if we all chose to exercise loving kindness in our relationships and connections with others. Change starts with us. Let us be here for one another to build up, not put down.

Let us take joy in each others’ successes and comfort one another through our hardships. Let us focus on our togetherness rather than our differences. Let us find peace in our connections with one another so that we may all experience love and wellbeing and this life.

This article is an edited extract from The Art Of Wellbeing by Meredith Gaston, published by Hardie Grant Books, RRP $29.99 and is available in stores nationally.

Broaden your horizons when it comes to #lowFODMAP grain & cereal options

Using non-traditional cereals and grains

Using Non-Traditional Cereals and Grains

By Dr Jane Varney – Research Dietitian

You may have found that since starting your low FODMAP diet, many of your favourite grain and cereal foods (pasta, gnocchi, breakfast cereal, bread, biscuits and many snack products) are off limits. These restrictions are due to the high fructan content of grains that commonly form the basis of these foods, namely wheat, rye and barley. While many of these foods have low FODMAP serves, to get all the nutritional benefits of wholegrain foods, you may need to broaden your horizons and try some non-traditional grain and cereal foods, many of which are low in FODMAPs. Low FODMAP grains and cereals to consider include:

  • Amaranth (puffed)
  • Bourghul
  • Buckwheat (kernals, flour)
  • Corn (cob, polenta, tortilla, popcorn)
  • Millet (grain, flour)
  • Oats (whole, quick, oatmeal)
  • Quinoa (grain, flakes, flour, pasta)
  • Rice (brown)
  • Sorgham (flour)

But how do you incorporate these grains into your diet? The following table gives you some tips on preparing in including these grains in your everyday diet. Just remember to check the Monash App for low FODMAP serving sizes.

Grain Preparation Use Tips
Polenta Bring water to a simmer. Add pinch of salt. Pour in polenta. Stir constantly for approximately 20-25 minutes. Serve as a side with meat or vegetables or make polenta chips. May spatter as it cooks, so use a long-handled wooden spoon. Cook over a low heat and stir constantly to remove lumps and avoid sticking. Cook in low FODMAP stock for extra flavour.
Quinoa Place quinoa in a saucepan of cold water, then bring to the boil. Simmer for 10 to 12 minutes. Salads, quinoa porridge. Rinse before cooking.
Oats Eat raw or add milk and microwave for a few minutes. Biscuits, slices, porridge, muesli.
Puffed amaranth Nil. Cereal, muesli, biscuits and slices.
Bourghul Soak in boiling water for approximately 30 minutes, then drain or boil for approximately 12 minutes then drain. Salads. Rinse before cooking.
Millet Boil for approximately 15 minutes, then drain and rinse. Salads, millet porridge. Rinse before cooking. Cook in low FODMAP stock for extra flavour.
Rice flour Nil. Shortbread, biscuits, slices. Rice flour is unlevened, so baking powder or soda may be needed if rising is important.
Sorghum flour Nil. Biscuits, cakes, slices, batters. Higher fibre than other fibres, so extra moisture may be needed (extra egg, butter or milk). Binds well without the addition of guar or xanthium gum. Naturally sweet flavour so less sugar may be used.
Tortilla (corn) Nil. Wraps, sandwiches, pizza base.
Popcorn Heat oil in a saucepan. Add popcorn kernals and cover with the lid. Cook for 3-4 minutes until popping subsides. Remove from heat. Plain popcorn, spiced popcorn, caramel popcorn.

Importance of Water for Good Health

Water, you cannot live without it

It is the most important source for maintaining life.  We cannot store water therefore we must drink it every day.

Our bodies are 70 % water and every organ in our body needs it to function.

The body loses water through breathing, sweating, and digestion, which is why it’s important to rehydrate by drinking fluids and eating foods that contain water. … Your body uses water in all its cells, organs, and tissues to help regulate its temperature and maintain other bodily functions (source).

Even minimal dehydration can cause:

  • Dry skin that doesn’t improve with lotion. …
  • Dry, sticky mouth and excessive thirst. …
  • You’re dealing with a headache. …
  • You’re tired all the time. …
  • You’re gaining weight. …
  • You’re coping with constipation. …
  • You are hungry
  • You’ve had a urinary tract infection.

First we feel thirsty and fatigued, and may develop a mild headache. This eventually gives way to grumpiness, and mental and physical decline (source)

Importance of water

Water is needed for most body functions, including to:

  • maintain the health and integrity of every cell in the body
  • keep the bloodstream liquid enough to flow through blood vessels
  • help eliminate the byproducts of the body’s metabolism, excess electrolytes (for example, sodium and potassium), and urea, which is a waste product formed through the processing of dietary protein
  • regulate body temperature through sweating
  • moisten mucous membranes such as those of the lungs and mouth
  • lubricate and cushion joints
  • reduce the risk of cystitis by keeping the bladder clear of bacteria
  • aid digestion and prevent constipation
  • moisturise the skin to maintain its texture and appearance
  • carry nutrients and oxygen to cells
  • serve as a shock absorber inside the eyes, spinal cord and in the amniotic sac surrounding the fetus in pregnancy.
Water-in-Body-01
by Freedesignfile.com

What happens when you dehydrate?

By the time you feel thirsty your body is already dehydrated; our thirst mechanism lags behind our actual level of hydration.

Dehydration of as little as 2% loss of body weight results in impaired physiological responses and performance.  It appears that brain tissue fluid decreases with dehydration, thus reducing brain volume and temporarily affecting cell function.

As you “lose” body water without replacing it, your blood becomes more concentrated and, at a point, this triggers your kidneys to retain water. The result: you urinate less.

The thicker and more concentrated your blood becomes, the harder it is for your cardiovascular system to compensate by increasing heart rate to maintain blood pressure (source).

Lack of water also negatively impacts oral hygiene.  Fluid intake can affect saliva production. Saliva, which is primarily water, is essential for maintenance of oral health.

Recommended daily fluid intake by the Victoria State Government

Approximate adequate daily intakes of fluids (including plain water, milk and other drinks) in litres per day include:

  • infants 0–6 months – 0.7 l (from breast milk or formula)
  • infants 7–12 months – 0.9 l (from breast milk, formula and other foods and drinks)
  • children 1–3 years – 1.0 l (about 4 cups)
  • children 4–8 years – 1.2 l (about 5 cups)
  • girls 9–13 years – 1.4 l (about 5-6 cups)
  • boys 9–13 years – 1.6 l (about 6 cups)
  • girls 14–18 years – 1.6 l (about 6 cups)
  • boys 14–18 years – 1.9 l (about 7-8 cups)
  • women – 2.1 l (about 8 cups)
  • men – 2.6 l (about 10 cups).
water-lubricate-joints-driving-force-all-nature-vector-illustration-bio-infographics-human-body-scheme-60019996
by Freedesignfile.com

Swap for Health

SWAP FOR HEALTH: Easy tips to keep you healthy

Eating healthy doesn’t have to be tricky. Here are some simple ideas that anyone can start with. Eat healthy food 80 percent of the time and your body and mind will thank you!

Choosing healthier foods is easier than you may think. By changing just a few eating habits you can make a big difference to your diet.

Healthy eating and getting active can help you lose centimetres and prevent or delay the onset of chronic diseases such as some cancers, type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

There are some simple everyday changes you can make to get you on your way to a healthier lifestyle without losing all the things you love.

The great thing is, you don’t have to stop it, just swap it. Swap inside for outside, or a big meal for a small meal for instance. It’s easy and these basic changes can make all the difference (source).

It’s all about eating fewer foods that are high in calories, fat, salt and sugars and swapping them for something healthier, including more fruit and vegetables and whole grains. Remember, small changes can add up to make a big overall difference to your diet.

If you have any health concerns or questions, be sure to come into the clinic and either book in for a consultation with one of our qualified naturopaths or talk to one of our knowledgeable staff members.
Monica (Naturopath): Gut health, DNA/methylation, allergies, stress and anxiety, thyroid and menopause.
Emily (Naturopath): Fertility and women’s health, skin conditions.
Nancy (Naturopath): Oncology/cancer, autism, special needs and is a qualified nutritionist.
Marie (Bowen therapist): Gentle body work to relieve musculoskeletal pain, injuries and for stress management.
Emily and Nancy will be available for naturopathic consultations as usual, as well as Marie for Bowen Therapy. Both Emily and Nancy have been mentored by Monica and can assist you with your health needs.

To book a consultation simply visit the clinic or call us on 9723 9755.

Kindest Regards,
Monica

How Healthy is your Thyroid?

How healthy is your thyroid?

I commonly see patients who have had their thyroid blood tests done, and told that they are all good. The problem is, they still feel fatigued, and know that something is not quite right.

Sub-clinical hypothyroidism is fairly widespread, but is often not recognised by your GP, as they will only look for overt signs of thyroid disease on your blood tests. As a Naturopath, I look to support people in optimal health, and just because you might not yet have thyroid disease, your thyroid might need some support to prevent it from moving this way in the future.

The medical reference range for a thyroid assessment is:

TSH 0.5-5.00, – But ideally we want to see it around 1-2

T4 10-20  – ideally  >15

T3  0.5-4.00 but ideally should be a 3:1 ratio to T4.

thyroid antibodies: ideally less than <60

FullSizeRender

Symptoms of a sluggish thyroid can present as: cognitive decline, cold hands and feet, dry skin, fatigue, weight gain, inability to lose weight, hair loss, depression, constipation, infertility, ovulation failure, miscarriage, muscle cramps and weakness, swelling and fluid retention.. to name a few.

There are many factors that interfere with our thyroid function:

Inflammation, oestrogen excess, aggressive caloric restriction (really low carbohydrate diets), environmental toxins, stress, and nutritional deficiencies.

The thyroid also needs the liver to work efficiently to help regulate thyroid hormones. The liver can often become overtaxed from an increased workload of processing medications, environmental toxins, too much sugar and excess alcohol. Liver function should always be assessed and supported when addressing thyroid health.

So, what is needed for optimal thyroid function?

There are some key nutrients that your thyroid needs to work effectively: these are iodine, zinc, selenium, iron, and vitamin B2.

You also need to make sure there are no hidden causes of inflammation in your body, such as poor gut health or stress, as this will greatly affect your thyroid function also.

If you are experiencing these symptoms, come and see one of our practitioners in clinic for a comprehensive assessment of your health and thyroid function.

Your Wellbeing Matters

Monica Roberts 

Make an appointment to come and have a chat.

(03) 9723 9755
Reference: Poppe K et al,2007, Nishimura Net a, 2004, 1998 Kelly G 200

 

Friedman, M 2014.

What is SIBO?

What Is SIBO?

SIBO is the acronym for “small intestinal bacterial overgrowth,” defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine. While bacterium naturally occurs throughout the digestive tract, in a healthy system, the small intestine has relatively low levels of bacteria; it’s supposed to be at highest concentrations in the colon.

shutterstock_84443176

The small intestine is the longest section of the digestive tract. This is where the food intermingles with digestive juices, and the nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream. If SIBO is indicated, malabsorption of nutrients, particularly fat-soluble vitamins and iron, can quickly become a problem.

When in proper balance, the bacterium in the colon helps digest foods and the body absorb essential nutrients. However, when bacteria invades and takes over the small intestine, it can lead to poor nutrient absorption, symptoms commonly associated with IBS, and may even lead to damage of the stomach lining.

When you have SIBO, as food passes through the small intestine, the bacterial overgrowth interferes with the healthy digestive and absorption process. The bacterium associated with SIBO actually consumes some of the foods and nutrients, leading to unpleasant symptoms, including gas, bloating and pain.

Even when treating small intestinal bacterial overgrowth with antibiotics, relapse rate is high. This is a chronic condition that can be cured, but it takes patience, perseverance and a change in diet. In fact, SIBO treatment include a healing diet, and some foods should be avoided until the gut flora is back in balance. (source)

Symptoms Include:

  • Bloating
  • Cramping
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhoea
  • Alternating constipation and diarrhoea
  • Food sensitivities
  • Belching and flatulence
  • Nausea
  • Heart burn
  • Fatigue
  • chronic digestive complaints
  • Abdominal cramping and pain
  • Joint pain
  • Skin Symptoms
  • Iron and B12 deficiency
  • Respiratory symptoms (eg: asthma)
  • Mood symptoms e.g.: depression and anxiety

What does it do?

Instead of allowing the villi and the microvilli in your small intestine to absorb nutrients from the food, the bacteria digest it instead, causing it to ferment.  A bi-product of the bacteria’s digestion is methane and/or hydrogen gas, which is only produced by the bacteria and not our bodies.

These cause bloating, flatulence, cramping, diarrhea and more.  It is also believed tis gas can cause leaky gut syndrome where the cell wall of the gut becomes permeable and allows food particles through to the blood stream.

SIBO Summer Cookbook by Rebecca Coomes is based on the SIBO Bi-Phasic diet by Dr Nirala Jacobi ND.  It is a great resource which  I highly recommend and I have for sale in the clinic.  It has 60 recipes for people treating small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

healthy food

This book is not just about recipes.  It teaches you about the foods to avoid and the foods to replace in your diet.  It informs and educates you, along with inspiring you to make easy changes in your diet to improve your health.

The diet and recipes in this book are designed around the 5 pillars of health.

1:  Awareness – being aware of your symptoms is the first step in your recovery

2:  Nutrition – nutrition is vital to a healthy gut life and essential to recovery

3:  Movement – our gut responds positively to movement

4:  Mindset – positive beliefs will support you to achieve wellness

5:  Lifestyle – the way you live your life is fundamental to recovery.

If you are concerned about your health or would like to talk more.  

Please contact Monica at Croydon Herbal Health.  Ph (03)  9723 9755

Your Wellness Matters

 

 

Your Body is an Orchestra

Your Body is an Orchestra by Monica Roberts
Today I went with my elderly relative to her rheumatologist . Oh my God!  Seriously!!.  Here’s what transpired..

DR: Good afternoon.

Us: Hello

Dr: How are you?

Us: Well you know not so good… she gave her story.. She’d been in hospital quite sick.

Dr: Oh thats too bad.

Me: U think! ( I didn’t say that)

Me: Do you think that there is a possibility that an infection like Lymes disease could be at the base of this case.  Could we arrange some kind of test.  Me knowing that she’s had a history of bacterial overgrowth, tick bites and ross river fever. 

Dr: There is no such thing as Lymes  disease in Australia.

Me; Hmmm

Me: Is it possible to get her tested for infections, bacterial, viral any other parasites.

Dr: You would have to see the infectious disease Dr for that.

Me: OK, Well she has some bowel issues and seems to play a role in her attacks, what do you think of the bowel or imbalance of bacteria having an impact?

Dr: Well you would have to see a gastroenterologist for that.

Me: How about her diet, do you think that it needs addressing?

Dr: I’m not sure how that would be, but you could see a dietitian I suppose.

Me: REALLY !! (i didn’t say that either).

Me: IN MY PRIVATE THOUGHTS.. DID YOU NOT  know that the body is an orchestra, and all of our organs, brain,  blood, tissues, skin  are linked, each having an effect on each other.  Diet, lifestyle, bowel, brain, stomach, lungs, heart Shall I go on.  You can’t look at one isolate organ to treat a person!. So times up, 10mins.. pay lots of money and off we go, with one more pain management drug to her 4 already.

Ok so I’m on my high horse.   I know there are some excellent Dr and practitioners out there doing amazing things, but at times I get very frustrated.

Imagine if we all worked together, what we could achieve.

Your wellbeing matters, and all of you is connected to all of you, you are not JUST a heart or a bowel or a lung.

Monica Roberts.

Suffering Cough and Cold Symptoms? Have some Pineapple

Pineapple – Fruit With Amazing Health Benefits

| This article was posted originally in Healthy Food House.  You can find more amazing articles here – follow this link.

pineapple-fruit-with-amazing-health-benefits
Pineapple is known as king of fruits, fruit which in the past was only available to natives of the tropics and the rich Europeans. This tropical plant originated from Uruguay, Brazil, Puerto Rico and Paraguay.Ripe and juicy pineapple will satisfy your sweet tooth.

Besides good taste there are many health benefits. Pineapple is rich in vitamins and minerals, and contains a low amount of fats and cholesterol.

Health Benefits of Pineapple

Pineapples contain roteolytic enzyme called bromelain. Bromelain breaks down proteins, has natural anti-inflammatory properties and reduce swelling. Pineapple helps in healing the sore throat, arthritis and joint pain.

Anti inflammatory properties of pineapple fruit reduce the symptoms of arthritis and help to reduce pain after surgery and sports injuries.

pineapple-fruit-with-amazing-health-benefits2

To increase the efficiency, pineapples should be consumed between meals without other foods. On the other hand, the health benefits of bromelain is improving digestion. If pineapples are consumed with other foods, bromelain will help in digesting it.One of the benefits of this fruit is that it helps to build healthy bones.

Pineapple is rich in magnesium and trace mineral that is needed by the body to build bone and connective tissue. Just one cup of pineapple juice provides 73% of the recommended daily amount of magnesium.

The benefit of pineapples can cause bone growth in young people and strengthening of bones in older people.

pineapple-fruit-with-amazing-health-benefits1

This fruit is a good source of vitamin C and it offers excellent protection from free radicals. According to research vitamin C, the most important water-soluble antioxidant is invaluable against the destructive effects of free radicals.

Pineapple is good for colds and cough. Usually when people get sick they consume orange juice as a source of vitamin C, but it is good to know that the benefits of pineapple juice against cold or cough are also good as orange juice, plus with additional benefits because of bromelain, which helps cough and other symptoms of colds and flu.

Pineapples can improve oral health. Eating pineapple reduces the risk of gingivitis and periodontitis. Besides increasing the ability of connective tissue to regenerate, it also increases the body’s ability to fight invading bacteria and other toxins that contribute to gum disease.

Australian scientists have found useful molecules in the stalk of pineapple. Initial studies have shown that they prevent the occurrence of certain types of cancer (cancer of breast, lung, colon, ovarian and skin cancer).

Among other benefits, the royal fruit relieves arthritis, helps with high blood pressure, bronchitis, throat infections, indigestion…

If you want to get all benefits of pineapple it is the best to be consumed fresh.

Allergies and Immune Deficiency

Todays Chat with Monica.

A client has had a spontaneous reaction to allergies. One weekend he decided on a getaway.  Whilst he was away and got bitten by mosquito, and then suffered immune deficiency.

mosquito.png
He came to see me and asked me:

‘Why does this happen?’

‘I’m usually really well.’

‘No body else got the virus!’

Well our health is like stacking the deck.  Or sometimes like falling dominoes. 

We don’t just get sick, we don’t just suddenly have heart attack, or hormonal disruption, or diarrhea.   Usually there are many factors that slowly stack up.

This is what happens: Let’s say you get stressed, more than usual.  Then you have a few bad nights of not sleeping  and your social commitments are high.   You don’t eat well because you are busy.   Your body’s resistance starts to fall, inflammation starts to rise, hormones start to deplete and your body’s ability to repair becomes compromised. Your ability to cope decreases.  It just takes someone walking past you with a cold, and before you know it… Your sick!   

We can minimise our body’s responses by remembering to breath deeply right into the belly, eat well, loads up on the greens, and get really good sleep.

See you in the clinic.

Your wellbeing matters.

Love Monica.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Do you Have a HISTAMINE INTOLERANCE

HISTAMINE INTOLERANCE

Do you suffer with allergies and regularly seek relief from anti-histamines?
Do you have irregular, painful periods?
Do you have a reaction to wine?

Do you suffer from anxiety?
Do experience dizziness or low blood pressure
Do you get hives or a red rash around your mouth?
Do certain foods give you an itchy tongue or runny nose?
Do you suffer from diarrhoea or bloating?

images-1

You may have Histamine Intolerance if you answered yes to any of these!

What is histamine?

So much more than just an allergy response!

Histamine is a vital messaging molecule involved in regulating many functions in our body like digestion, sleep, mood, sexual function and our brain. Histamine is found in the mucous membranes in the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, uterus, lungs, skin, brain; produced by cells in our body; and present in certain foods. There are four different kinds of receptors in the body and each respond uniquely. 

Histamine and your Immune system

Histamine triggers an immune response which causes your blood vessels to dilate or swell so that your white blood cells can act quickly to an injury or infection. A histamine release can cause headaches and can leave you feeling tired and lethargic. While this is normal and part of the body’s natural immune response, if there’s a prolonged period where you don’t break down histamine properly, you could develop histamine intolerance (HIT).

What is Histamine intolerance?

Histamine intolerance (i.e. increased histamine in bloodstream) occurs when there is an imbalance between intake of histamine and the ability to eliminate it from the body. The condition is often misdiagnosed because it presents with many different kinds of symptoms, which are often misinterpreted.

How does it happen?

Under normal circumstances there is a barrier formed by enzymes DAO and HMNT that work to breakdown histamine in the GI Tract, preventing resorption of histamine from food into the bloodstream. Histamine intolerance can be caused when the amount of these protective enzymes is insufficient or these enzymes are inhibited. In this instance, even ingestion of a small amount of histamine in food (usually well tolerated in healthy individuals) can lead to symptoms of high histamine levels.

Possible causes of high levels of circulating histamine:

  • Genetic predisposition
  • Environmental factors
  • Allergy response
  • Methylation issues
  • Psychological Stress
  • Dietary choices
  • Conditions of GI tract (SIBO, inflammatory bowel diseases, infections, parasitic infestations, dysbiosis, leaky gut)
  • Inhibition of DAO from alcohol or medications
  • Histamine-producing bacteria in the GI tract

Each individual’s tolerance to histamine is different and HIT is often caused by a ‘perfect storm’; accumulation of factors subsequently resulting in a symptom picture. Histamine can affect all of your bodily systems, including your gut, skin, brain, lungs and cardiovascular system. This explains why it may cause such a wide range of problems.

sleep

For example:

  • Abdominal cramps
  • Anxiety
  • Bowel irregularities
  • Depression
  • Difficulty in breathing
  • Dizziness
  • Drop in blood pressure 
  • Flushing
  • Fatigue
  • Fluctuating body temp
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Heart palpitations
  • Hives
  • Nasal congestion
  • Period cramping, heavy bleeding and pain – due to receptor sites in the uterus
  • Puffy eyes
  • Skin reactions
  • Vomiting 
  • how-to-manage-allergies-in-young-children

What can we do about it?

Diagnosis of HIT is usually made by a person trialling a low ­histamine diet (list found below) for a couple of weeks and seeing whether symptoms improve. To manage HIT, histamine will continue to be limited in an individual’s diet according to their threshold. Please always remember that there is no such thing as a “histamine-free diet”! It is also important to assess all possible contributing factors e.g. GI Tract conditions, stress, environment etc. with the help of a health care professional. HIT is often about management, for some it is life long and for others it is easily managed.

Diet

Some foods naturally contain high histamine, while others accumulate histamines as they age. Therefore, a low histamine diet will mainly focus on eating fresh foods. The lists below give indications of some of the foods that affect those with HIT (high in histamine, releasing histamine, DAO blocking foods, low histamine) and helps to devise a diet for sufferers.

Foods high in histamine:  

  • Aged cheese: Goats cheese, parmesan (the older, the higher is the histamine level)
  • Dried fruit: apricots, prunes, dates, figs, raisins
  • Fermented alcoholic drinks: especially champagne, wine, beer, cider
  • Fermented foods: Sauerkraut, vinegar, soy sauce, kefir, yoghurt, kombucha, etc
  • Fruit & Vegetables: Avocado, most citrus fruits, eggplant, pumpkin, spinach, tomatoes
  • Nuts: especially walnuts and cashew nuts
  • Processed & smoked meat products: salami, ham, bacon, sausages etc
  • Soured foods: sour cream, sour milk, buttermilk, soured bread, etc.
  • Tinned and smoked fish: tuna, salmon, herring, mackerel, sardines
  • Vinegar-containing foods: dressings, pickles, mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard, olives
  • Processed food of all types – preservatives are high in histamines
  • Mushrooms
  • Long cooked Bone broth
  • Pre-made salads
  • Tinned vegetables
  • Yeast, yeast extract

Histamine-releasing foods

Certain foods can stimulate the release of histamine from cells in your body, therefore important to avoid or limit in a low-histamine diet.

These foods include:  

  • Additives: benzoate, sulphites, nitrites, glutamate, dyes
  • Alcohol
  • Beans and legumes: chickpeas, soy beans
  • Chocolate and other cocoa based products
  • Cow’s milk
  • Egg white
  • Fruits & Vegetables: Avocado, banana, most citrus fruits, eggplant, grapefruit, kiwi, mango, papaya, pineapple, pumpkin, spinach, strawberries, tomatoes
  • Shellfish
  • Spices: cinnamon, cloves, cayenne, cloves, chili powder, curry powder & nutmeg
  • Tomatoes
  • Wheat germ

Diamine Oxidase (DAO) blockers (increase histamine levels):  

  • Alcohol
  • Black tea, Green tea, Mate tea  
  • Caeine, theobromine (chocolate)  
  • Energy drinks  
  • Wheat (some HIT suerers)  

Unknown

Low Histamine Foods

  • Coconut milk, Rice milk, Hemp milk
  • Coconut oil & Grass-fed Butter/Ghee
  • Fresh Fruits: Other than citrus, avocado, tomato, pineapple, bananas and strawberries
  • Fresh Vegetables (except eggplant, pumpkin and spinach)
  • Freshly Cooked Meat & Poultry (frozen or fresh)
  • Freshly Caught Fish
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Gluten-Free Grains: brown rice & quinoa
  • Herbal teas
  • Leafy herbs
  • Pasture-Raised Eggs

Please be aware, due to any other food intolerances or cross-allergies that may also be present the low-histamine level of a particular food alone says nothing definite about whether or not an individual can tolerate it and it is important to follow professional advice. 

Contact the clinic on 9723-9755 to book an appointment or make an inquiry.

Monica

images

 

 

References:

26. Histamine Intolerance: The Food List

http://www.histamineintolerance.org.uk/about/the-food-diary/the-food-list/

27. Michigan Allergy: Foods and Histamine

http://www.michiganallergy.com/food_and_histamine.shtml

28. International Society Of DAO Deficiency: DAO blocking foods

http://www.deficitdao.org/en/dao-deficiency/histamine/food-which-interferes-in-histamine-metabolism/dao-blockingfoods/#.VRqzVY7F_uN

29. ICUS: Histamine-Restricted Diet

https://chronichives.com/useful-information/histamine-restricted-diet/